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Memory of “Bones” from Star Trek – Actor DeForest Kelley passed away 22 years ago from stomach cancer

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Memory of "Bones" from Star Trek - Actor DeForest Kelley passed away 22 years ago from stomach cancer

Memory of DeForest Kelly

  • DeForest Kelly, the original Dr. Leonard McCoy from star trek, died 22 years ago due to a terminal diagnosis of stomach cancer.
  • If diagnosed at an early stage, stomach cancer is highly treatable (with a five-year survival rate of about 68%), usually with surgery and chemotherapy. However, when diagnosed in later stages, it becomes much more difficult to treat and is usually considered incurable.
  • Recognizing symptoms of stomach cancer can be very difficult. The most common symptom is mild pain that can be easily mistaken for indigestion. Other possible symptoms include loss of appetite, heartburn, indigestion, nausea and vomiting, unexplained weight loss, fatigue and bloating.

It’s been 22 years since we lost DeForest Kelley, the original Dr. Leonard McCoy from Every Sci-Fi Fan’s Favorite Franchise Star Trek. His death from stomach cancer was a huge hit for fans around the world, but he is still remembered for his portrayal as one of the most iconic TV characters in history.

Related: 5 Life Lessons We Learned From Mr. Rogers, Who Died Of Stomach Cancer 18 Years Ago

Known for bickering with Spock and inspiring fans to attend medical school, Kelley brought the character of Dr. Leonard McCoy to life. while his Star Trek role is what many know him for, Kelley first garnered acclaim in the 1947 feature film Fear in the night. Throughout his career, Kelley played numerous movie villains before being cast in the original Star Trek TV series from 1966 to 1969. He later played the role in the first six Star Trek movies from 1979 to 1991.

Memory of "Bones" from Star Trek - Actor DeForest Kelley passed away 22 years ago from stomach cancer

While he Dr. McCoy portrayed, Kelley was quietly diagnosed with stomach cancer mid nineties. According to his good friend Kristine M. SmithKelley hasn’t released much information about his illness or treatment plan since Smith’s mother was fighting brain cancer. It wasn’t until 1999 that Kelley Smith announced that he had been diagnosed with cancer terminal after a visit to the intensive care unit. According to Smith, Kelley chose not to make his diagnosis public and only share the news with close friends and family. Smith and Kelly’s wife, Carolyn Kelley, served as his principal sources of support during the last days. Kelley died of stomach cancer on June 11, 1999.

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“He knew they would flood him with cards and letters, and he always replied personally when someone wrote to him, but he knew he wouldn’t be able to answer them all,” Smith told The Spectrum. “He was still getting a lot of mail, so I suggested sending a form letter, but he said ‘absolutely not’ and kept signing pictures as long as he could. He never had an assistant because Carolyn always helped him.”

Cancer survivor Lillian Kreppel explains how to talk to loved ones about cancer

Understanding Stomach Cancer

In the initial stages, stomach cancer Cancer (also known as stomach cancer) often doesn’t cause many symptoms, making it difficult to identify early. The most common symptom is mild pain that can be easily mistaken for indigestion. Possible other symptoms include loss of appetite, heartburn, indigestion, nausea and vomiting, unexplained weight loss, fatigue and bloating. But a host of other health conditions can cause the same symptoms, so testing is needed to determine the cause.

Related: Floss Today To Reduce Your Chances Of Stomach And Esophageal Cancer Tomorrow

In most parts of the world, stomach cancers arise in the largest part of the stomach, the stomach body. But in the US, it’s more likely to affect the area where the esophagus meets the stomach. Diet and lifestyle differences around the world affect the prevalence and type of stomach cancer. Where the cancer occurs is a factor that contributes to treatment decisions. If diagnosed at an early stage, stomach cancer is highly treatable (with a five-year survival rate of about 68%), usually with surgery and chemotherapy. However, when diagnosed in later stages, it becomes much more difficult to treat and is usually considered incurable.

Marc Futterweit, who is a cancer survivor twice, encourages men not to ignore symptoms and speak up if they feel something is wrong

Learn more about SurvivorNet’s rigorous medical assessment process.

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